Tag: Child Psychologist Toronto

Parenting Means Partnership: A New Approach for How To Potty Train Your Toddler

Natasha Sharma is a personal development and happiness expert, and author of internationally featured “The Kindness Journal,”  a guided interactive journal for cultivating a happier and more positive life.

I’m a mom. Of two very sweet boys. The second who joined us a mere three months ago! Having been a member of the MOB (mom of boys) squad for some time now, I’m already well versed in the nuances that come with changing baby boy diapers: The moving aside of the ‘bits and pieces’, the always-when-you’re-not-expecting-it pee pee spray, and have I just been living in a house of boys for too long or does their ‘business’ really smell worse than girls?!

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What Is A Psychoeducational Assessment? 16 Signs Your Child May Need One

By Natasha Sharma

When a child grapples with behaviour and/or learning issues, it can be a challenge not only for the child but also for parents and teachers. To make things more complicated, children can struggle in one specific area of learning or subject area, or they may present with difficulties in general with their learning or behaviour. This can make things confusing to parents and teachers, and an assessment is often recommended to parents. So what is a Psychoeducational Assessment? And when does your child need one?

If a child struggles at school or in an area of learning, it doesn’t mean that the child necessarily has a learning disorder or other developmental issue. Indeed, it’s been widely observed that sleep deprivation almost perfectly mimics the symptoms of ADHD. Therefore just because a child or student has challenges with focus, concentration, and holding attention doesn’t mean that they have ADHD.

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Is There a ‘Right’ Time to Have a Baby?

By Natasha Sharma

At least twice a week in my practice, I will have a young, bright, and ambitious 20-something year old woman sitting across from me. We’ll ponder life together: Career, friends, hobbies, and relationships. And invariably at least once a week, one of them will tell me that she has a life plan, which includes having kids before the age of 30. The closer they might be to said age without the prospect of procreation in sight, the more angst they feel about ‘missing the deadline.’ When I inquire as to why the deadline is age 30, the response is usually that having kids over the age of 30 is “too old.” Other female clients of mine feel the opposite; they are in no rush and instead state that they in fact prefer to have kids much later in life. Still others, albeit a much smaller percentage, report that they know they never want to have kids and that, my friends, is totally fine (hey, it’s 2015!) But for the ones who know they want them, which is still likely to be most, it raises an interesting question: Is there such a thing as the right time to have children in life? Since 2013, the average age at which Canadian women had their first child topped 30 years. Assuming planned pregnancies by couples and/or otherwise stable familial units, I looked at the pros of having children under age 30 and of having them over age 30 (30 truly seems to be a demarcation point for so many in life, and on so many levels!). Here goes:

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The Human Condition and Mourning the Loss of Empathy

By Natasha Sharma

It’s been several weeks since the public funeral of Elijah Marsh, a Toronto toddler who wandered out into the snow in the middle of the night and died of hypothermia. In the aftermath of this heartbreaking tragedy, many an opinion has been expressed in the media about it, ranging from criticism of the amount of money raised for the Marsh family in an online fundraising campaign to cover funeral expenses, to criticism of the perceived cultural phenomenon of mourning the loss of people we don’t know. As a Psychotherapist and mental health expert, and after reading various articles in the media, most notably, a recent piece from a well-known Globe & Mail reporter, I felt compelled to respond with a different perspective on this matter.

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Attention Ladies and Gentlemen…How to Stay Focused in an Overstimulating World.

By Natasha Sharma

Attention, or more specifically the lack thereof, has been the subject of much research, heated debate, and discussion for some time now. In addition to the substantial amount of time and money allocated to the scientific study and medical etiology of inattention, it has become a prevalent topic in a wide range of more accessible communication mediums. On what seems like a near daily basis, one or more of the local newspapers will carry an article or spotlight on the subject. Add to this the copious amounts of information available online, information received from healthcare and education providers, television programs, parenting groups, on the playground, or even at your weekend dinner party, and one is left with a myriad of opinions.
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